082 GGP 0416

GGP 04 Apr 2016

Ask the Expert: Fire resistant glass Simon Ellison, technical sales manager at Pyroguard Question: Why should I use ‘EW’ rated fire glass? Under EN 13501-2, fire glass classifications are defined as E, EW or EI. E is integrity only which is a barrier to smoke and flames, EW is with the addition of radiated heat control and EI is with the addition of full thermal insulation. To qualify as an EW rated glass, when tested in accordance with EN 1363, the amount of radiated heat passing through the glass at the qualifying time (30 minutes, 60 minutes etc) must not exceed 15 Kw/m². When comparing this level of radiation to say a polished wired glass, the amount of radiated heat passing through the polished wired is approximately 22 Kw/m², as opposed to 7mm Pyroguard being at approximately 11 kw/m², so a considerable difference. Unfortunately, UK building regulations only recognise E and EI fire classifications, but the advantage of specifying EW over E should not be underestimated. It can reduce the risk of spread of fire compared with an integrity only glass by reducing heat transmittance, which in turn reduces the risk of potential spontaneous combustion to materials on the non-fire rated side. The Pyroguard range of products offers a coverage of all classifications including an extensive EW range. 82 G L A S S & G L A S S PROCESSING A solid response from TuffX Specialist toughened glass manufacturer, TuffX Processed Glass, has announced the launch of a new product which it says will give conservatory roof installers a more cost effective alternative to the solid tiled conservatory roof replacement. Called Ambi-Solid, the new solid glass roof system is said to be lighter, quicker and easier to install than traditional solid tile effect roofs. Graham Price, TuffX’s managing director, explained: “In recent times there has been an explosion in solid tile effect roofs to satisfy the dilemma of a conservatory being too cold in winter and too warm in summer. But while this option is fine for some, a conservatory is sold as a light and airy light-filled space and a solid tiled effect roof will not only make the conservatory a darker space, but it can reduce light to adjoining rooms, too. With Ambi- Solid you now have the option of a solid glass panel solution which eliminates the too hot, too cold dilemma but without loss of light. In short, with Ambi-Solid you have the best of both worlds.” The Ambi-Solid Glass is a 24mm double-glazed unit that can be used in all or part of the roof. The remaining panels can be replaced with tinted high performance conservatory roof glass to match the performance and aesthetics of the solid glass. According to Tuffx, the Ambi-Solid Glass Panel has a ‘U’ value of 1.1 W/m²K and can improve the energy efficiency of a conservatory. The Ambi-Solid Glass is reportedly around 50% cheaper than a solid tile effect alternative and requires no structural work to the roof in order to accommodate the panels while the solid glass panels are said to be quick and easy to fit. Tuffx also points out that, because installers are not having to change the structure of the conservatory into an extension, as you would with a solid tiled roof, the Ambi-Solid roof is exempt from Building Regulations, too. Graham said: “Our research has shown that homeowners clearly enjoy a viable alternative to a full roof replacement. They welcome the benefits the Ambi-Solid Glass can offer in terms of light, speed of installation and cost. And because the product offers 78% solar heat reflection, they have a room that can be enjoyed throughout the seasons too.” www.tuffxglass.co.uk Guardian meets BES standard Guardian Industries UK (Guardian) has earned the BES 6001 accreditation for its responsible sourcing of materials. After independent assessment by the British Standards Institution Guardian UK reportedly received a ‘very good’ score, highlighting the company’s long-term focus on sustainability and environmental responsibility. The Building Research Establishment (BRE) BES 6001 certification assesses how well companies operate within strict standards of supply chain management and environmental and social responsibility when managing relationships with suppliers. Specifically, it acknowledges the ‘Responsible Sourcing of Construction Products.’ Steven Scrivens, marketing manager for Guardian Glass UK & Ireland, said: “We’ve been following the development of this standard for many years. We worked with both British Glass and with BRE – the authors of the standard – to help them to better understand the glass and glazing industry and how the standard could be applied to address this construction product in the supply chain.” www.ggpmag.com April 2016


GGP 04 Apr 2016
To see the actual publication please follow the link above