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GGP March 2014

Case Study Amazing glazing is far from elementary Conservatory Plus discovers the secrets of the striking glazing project that stole the show in a recent episode of TV’s Sherlock. While many of the 8.8m viewers of a recent episode of Sherlock will have been enthralled by the encounter between arch villain Charles Magnussen and Sherlock Holmes at the villain’s impressively glazed lair, it would seem that the £30m Swinhay House, masquerading as 'Appledore' in the last instalment has generated almost as much interest. It is unlikely that when the property’s owner, 58 March 2014 engineer Sir David McMurty, sat down with his architect, Roberts Limbrick, to plan the build, featuring a fully enclosed and glazed ‘Winter Garden’ conservatory, he expected to see helicopters landing on his lawn, with the occupants aiming assault rifles at Sherlock actors Benedict Cumberbatch, Martin Freeman and Lars Mikkelsen. The conservatory does in fact house a 'winter garden' and reportedly uses a combination of both ‘natural and hi-tech mechanical solutions’ to combat problems surrounding solar gain and insulation. Akin to a rugby ball profile, curving in both planes, the winter garden has no internal columns, despite being the length of a five-a-side football pitch. At its highest the conservatory reaches to 9.7m, providing an atrium space for three storeys of the main house at one end, giving stunning views of the interior garden space. The glass facade includes triple glazed Swinhay House, masqueraded as 'Appledore' in a recent episode of ‘Sherlock’ The house itself was constructed under temporarily relaxed planning and building regulations on the proviso that the build was of ‘significant architectural interest’


GGP March 2014
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