Fibreglass ‘first’ from Boavista

Boavista is bringing what it claims is Europe’s first full range of sustainable fibreglass window frames to the UK.

The new range, which is said to ‘set new industry standards’ in sustainability, durability and performance, includes a tilt and turn, sash, casement and sliding window and door product, all of which are reportedly 100%t recyclable and deliver longer lifecycles than uPVC and aluminium frames as a result of fibreglass’s inherent qualities.

Boavista’s rigidity also enables its sliding windows and doors to withstand single panes that weigh in excess of 250kg, which is approximately 150 per cent more than its aluminium and PVC-U counterparts. This means that those wishing to incorporate glass as a major design feature no longer need to commission and fit specialist, structural glass.

Boavista is exclusively available to the UK through Boavista Windows UK, a company formed by the team behind Meronden Designs, a 20-year-old firm that has provided bespoke glazing for the Lloyds Building, Tiffany & Co. Selfridges in Manchester and Ernst & Young’s iconic More London Place building.

Using the latest in pultrusion technology Boavista’s fibreglass frames are created by pulling resin-soaked glass fibres through heated dies – a process that only consumes 0.07 kilowatt to produce a linear metre of window frame weighing approximately 1kg.

The result is a frame with high thermal and acoustic properties that enables the window to retain heat whilst providing an effective barrier to sound.

The company expects Boavista’s UK arrival to be welcomed by architects and housebuilders as a result of the window’s minimalist design and stylish finish. Fibreglass also expands in line with window glass, removing the need for unsightly gaskets generally required to hold the pane in place and adding aesthetic value to a development.

On launching Boavista in the UK Neil Puttock, managing director of Boavista Windows UK, commented: “Boavista provides an alternative window product that offers those who use it the opportunity to contribute towards reducing the UK’s carbon footprint without compromising on design, function or form. From the perspective of an architect or homeowner, fibreglass frames open up a world of possibilities by supporting adventurous designs that, up until now, have been prohibitive due to the cost associated with incorporating bespoke glazing solutions.”

Neil concludes: “There really is no comparison between Boavista and other window products currently on the market. We now need to make the case for fibreglass and inform those who naturally turn to PVC-U and aluminium just what fibreglass is capable of.”

www.boavistawindows.co.uk